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Kudzu
by Larry Pace



Long years ago, in Philly at the Expo,
the kudzu vine was brought in from Japan.
Its large leaves and sweet blossoms were a hit, so
the gardeners in the U.S. made a plan.
They planted it for forage and for show, too,
and later used it to control erosion.
The problem was that this pernicious kudzu
adapted well, and started an explosion.
The southern people soon were filled with dread,
for kudzu grows about a foot a day.
It quickly covers up, and leaves for dead
most anything that gets into its way.
At one time, folks desired the kudzu plant,
but now they’d like to kill it -- and they can’t.


(c) 2002 Larry Pace

___________________


Author’s note: The fascinating story of the introduction of kudzu to the U.S. and how it ultimately came to be classified as a weed can be found at the following web site: www.cptr.ua.edu/kudzu


Goats 1, Kudzu 0
Researchers have found that most herbicides have no effect on kudzu, and some of them actually cause it to grow better. The most effective kudzu control strategy thus far is to raise Angora goats in kudzu fields. The goats provide profitable milk and wool products while keeping the kudzu from spreading.

Overgrazing will eventually eradicate the kudzu, and if the food source is to be renewed, the goats must be removed occasionally to allow the vines time to grow!
(Source: www.cptr.ua.edu/kudzu)




Larry Pace
Another great one:
She Always Got Her Fish


Larry Pace is a management consultant. He earned the Ph.D. in industrial psychology from the University of Georgia, and has served as college professor, college dean, MBA program director, internal and external consultant, business owner, and a manager for a Fortune 100 firm. He has published more than 80 articles, chapters, and reviews, and has co-authored a book on employee assistance programs. Larry also writes poetry and enjoys teaching poetic form. He lives in Shreveport, Louisiana.

Contact Larry at this address.



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